What if every church
made it their mission to
serve the vulnerable?

Our Work

OrphanCare

Every child possesses remarkable, Gold-given potential. Wow is committed to bring hope & love into the lives of some of the world’s most vulunarable children.

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Every child possesses remarkable, God-given potential. WOW is committed to bring hope & love into the lives of some of the world’s most vulunarable children.

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WidowCare

Empowering women in sub-Saharan Africa is the key to building healthy families and communities. WOW is empowering women by providing access to resources, and long-term sustainability projects.

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MotherCare

Women in sub-Saharan Africa face some of the highest maternal & infant mortality rates in the world. WOW builds maternal support networks in vulnerable communities giving access to pre and post-natal care for at-risk mothers.

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Leadership Development

Investing in local local champions is the key to long-term sustainability & transformation within communities. WOW partners with African churches and Christian leaders who demonstrate a commitment to serve the poor.

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WOW partners with local community organizations in sub-Saharan Africa as they care for orphans and widows.

“Around me I see children orphaned by HIV/AIDS, living on the streets because they have no home. With WOW we are caring for over 4000 girls and boys. They receive hot meals and an education. WOW is helping us be the hands and feet of Christ.”

-Pastor Eric Mwambelo, WOW Partner

Where we Work

We currently work for orphans
and widows in Africa

Population: 15.9 Million
Capital: Lilongwe
# of people with HIV: 980,000
Poverty Rate: 50.7%
% of gender-based violence victims: 41.2
Infant mortality rate (per 1000 live births): 43.4%

Population: 39 Million
Capital: Kampala
# of people with HIV: 1.5 Million
Poverty Rate: 70.7%
% of gender-based violence victims: 31.2
Infant mortality rate (per 1000 live births): 37.7%

Population: 16.2 Million
Capital: Lusaka
# of people with HIV: 1 200 000
Poverty Rate: 20.7%
% of gender-based violence victims: 21.2
Infant mortality rate (per 1000 live births): 43.3%

Why Malawi? >

Population: 15.9 Million
Capital: Lilongwe
# of people with HIV: 980,000
Poverty Rate: 50.7%
% of gender-based violence victims: 41.2
Infant mortality rate (per 1000 live births): 43.4%

*Statistics taken from UNDP and UNAIDS

Why Uganda? >

Population: 39 Million
Capital: Kampala
# of people with HIV: 1.5 Million
Poverty Rate: 70.7%
% of gender-based violence victims: 31.2
Infant mortality rate (per 1000 live births): 37.7%

*Statistics taken from UNDP and UNAIDS

 

Why Zambia? >

Population: 16.2 Million
Capital: Lusaka
# of people with HIV: 1 200 000
Poverty Rate: 20.7%
% of gender-based violence victims: 21.2
Infant mortality rate (per 1000 live births): 43.3%

*Statistics taken from UNDP and UNAIDS

Source: UN Human Development Report(UNDP) and UNAIDS

  • Host an event
  •  Be an advocate
  • Change a life

WOW  UPDATES

“Pure and genuine religion in the sight of God the Father means caring for orphans and widows in their distress & refusing to let the world corrupt you”

James 1:27 (NLT)

John Knox Christian School Service Saturday

John Knox Christian School Service Saturday

This past sunny Saturday morning we had the pleasure of hosting John Knox Christian School Oakville’s student service team for a service project and learning experience with our WOW Team. The John Knox team consisted of 15 students from grades 6-8, along with some...

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A New Dawn for Delori- A Maternal Healthcare Story

A New Dawn for Delori- A Maternal Healthcare Story

Delori is just one woman who has reaped the benefits from the transport vouchers made available through WOW’s MotherCare program. The closest hospital to Delori’s home is nearly four hours away, by bike. Without these vouchers, she would not have had...

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Maternal Healthcare Strides Being Made in Malawi

Maternal Healthcare Strides Being Made in Malawi

Though 2.6 million babies around the world do not survive beyond a month, according to a recent BBC report, the numbers in Malawi have dropped significantly between 1990 and 2016. In fact, according to the Malawi Demographic Health Survey, from 1990 to...

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